Village of Donnelly

Notices

Voting Information for October 18, 2021

VOTERS:

No 2021 Municipal Elections will be held for the Village of Donnelly. All nominees have been acclaimed to Council.

Albertans are voting to select 3 Senate nominees who may be summoned to the Senate of Canada, to fill a vacancy or vacancies relating to Alberta. Albertans are also being asked two questions in the referendum vote on October 18, 2021. Both referendum questions allow for a ‘yes’ vote or a ‘no’ vote and are binding on the provincial government, based on the majority of votes cast.

www.elections.ab.ca/senate-and-referendum/

An election will be held for the election of a Senate nominee for the purposes of the Alberta Senate Election Act;

additionally

A vote of the electors will be held on the following referendum question(s) under the Referendum Act;

  1. Should Section 36(2) of the Constitution Act, 1982 – Parliament and the government of Canada’s commitment to the principle of making equalization payments – be removed from the Constitution?
  2. Do you want Alberta to adopt year-round Daylight Saving Time, which is summer hours,

eliminating the need to change our clocks twice a year?

Voting will take place on the 18th day of October 2021, between the hours of 10:00 am and 8:00 pm.

Voting stations will be located at:

Village of Donnelly Office, 5003 3rd Street, Donnelly, AB

 

In order to vote, you must produce identification for inspection. The identification must be one or more of:

  • GOVERNMENT IDENTIFICATION
  • INCOME/PROPERTY TAX ASSESSMENT NOTICE
  • UTILITY BILL
  • BANK OR CREDIT CARD STATEMENT OR PERSONAL CHEQUE
  • INSURANCE POLICY OR COVERAGE CARD
  • RESIDENTIAL LEASE AGREEMENT

Further Voter Identification Requirements

In order to vote in the upcoming municipal elections, voters will be required to provide proof of their name and home address. The following types of verification meet the standard provincial requirement for one piece of identification.

  • Identification issued by a Canadian government, whether federal, provincial or local, or an agency of that government, that contains a photograph of the elector and their name and current address.
  • Proof of Identity and Ordinary Residence for Tenant Elector issued by the authorized representative of a commercial property management company.
  • Proof of Identity and Ordinary Residence for Incarcerated Elector issued by the authorized representative of a correctional institution.
  • Proof of Identity and Ordinary Residence issued by the authorized representative of a First Nations band or reserve.
  • Proof of Identity and Ordinary Residence for Post-Secondary Student Elector in Residence issued by the authorized representative of a post-secondary institution.
  • Proof of Identity and Ordinary Residence for Homeless Elector issued by the authorized representative of a facility that provides services to the homeless.
  • Proof of Identity and Ordinary Residence for Elector in Long Term Care or Supportive Living Facility issued by the authorized representative of a supportive living facility or treatment centre.
  • Supportive Living Facility issued by the authorized representative of a supportive living facility or treatment centre.
  • Bank or credit card statement or personal cheque.
  • Correspondence issued by a school, college or university.
  • Government cheque or cheque stub.
  • Income or property tax assessment notice.
  • Insurance policy or coverage card.
  • Letter from a public curator, public guardian or public trustee.
  • Pension plan statement of benefits, contributions or participation.
  • Residential lease or mortgage statement.
  • Statement of government benefits (for example, employment insurance, old-age security, social assistance, disability support or child tax benefit).
  • Utility bill (for example, telephone, public utilities commission, television, hydro, gas or water).
  • Vehicle ownership, registration or insurance certificate.

If a voter’s identification shows a post office box number as the address instead of a residential or legal address, it can be accepted as verification of current address if it is in reasonable distance to the voting jurisdiction.

https://www.alberta.ca/municipal-elections-overview.aspx#toc-1

Updated Local Authorities Election Act

The Local Authorities Election Act (LAEA) governs municipal and school division elections in Alberta. It sets out rules and regulations for candidates, donors, electors, and election administrators that must be followed before, during and after an election.

We strongly encourage curious voters to review the LAEA to gain a better understanding of Municipal Elections in Alberta.

Screen Tests are coming to McLennan – November 9 to 9, 2021

The AHS Screen Test Mobile Mammography Clinic will be returning to McLennan November 6 to 9, 2021Screen Tests are coming McLennan

Screen Test brings breast cancer screening to women across Alberta with its state-of-the-art mobile mammography unit. As part of the new Integrated Access to Cancer Screening project, we are pleased to be partnering with AHS Screening Programs to bring cervical and colorectal screening services in McLennan November 8 & 9, 2021.

Due to COVID-19, the Screen Test mobile mammography service was suspended for three months in 2020. Although service has resumed, we are several months behind on our usual rotation due to these delays. Screen Test is taking a number of precautions to ensure the safety of our clients and staff and to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Details will be shared when clients call to book an appointment.

Here’s some information about the clinic:

What: AHS Screen Test Mobile Mammography Clinic

Additional Services: Cervical (Pap tests) and colorectal screening (FIT home stool test) services

How to book: Call 1-800-667-0604 (toll-free) and complete the Screen Test Resource Order Form v.3

Cost: None

Who should be screened for breast cancer?

  • Women 50 to 74: This group is most commonly diagnosed with breast cancer, and should plan to have a mammogram every 2 years until they turn 75. This group can self-refer.
  • Women 40 to 49: Screening is optional and they should discuss the risks and benefits of screening with their health care provider. A referral is needed for their first mammogram in Alberta, which is available online here.
  • Women 75 and over: Can continue screening and should discuss the risks and benefits with their health care provider.
  • Screening mammograms are not recommended for women under age 40: Women in this age group should discuss their breast cancer risk and mammography options with their health care provider.

Why are mammograms important? Screening mammograms are routine tests used to find early signs of cancer in women who have no breast problems or symptoms. They can find changes in the breast that are too small to be felt by a woman or her doctor. Early detection with mammograms is one of the reasons that most women (90%) are now surviving breast cancer.

Who should be screened for cervical cancer?

Women 25 to 69: This group should receive cervical cancer screening, also known as Pap tests. After the first Pap test, women should have a Pap test once every three years.

Why is cervical cancer screening important? Pap tests are used to find potential health issues or conditions before symptoms appear.  Regular Pap tests check for cervical cell changes, which can be followed closely to make sure they clear up. 90% of cervical cancer can be prevented with early treatment.

Who should be screened for colorectal cancer?

Everyone aged 50 to 74: This group should receive regular colorectal screening.  A consultation with a healthcare provider can determine if the FIT home stool test or colonoscopy is the right test.

Why is colorectal screening important? Colorectal cancer screening looks for early signs of cancer in people who feel well and have no symptoms. Colorectal cancer is easier to treat when found at an early stage. 90% of cases can be treated successfully if found early.

To learn more about cancer screening services, visit screeningforlife.ca or call us at 1-800-667-0604.

 

Recycling

RECYCLING

Do you have recyclable materials using valuable space in your home, garage or shed? Get rid of your recyclables at the curb with the blue bag program, or at Grandma’s Den in Falher, McLennan Bottle Depot and Smoky River Regional Landfill.

Please see below what recyclables are accepted at each location.

Blue Bag Program

2021 Blue Bag Recycling Collection Calendar

You can recycle the following items with the Blue Bag Program:

  • Newsprint/Heavy paper: newspaper, magazines, phone books, catalogues, flyers
  • Mixed Paper: office paper, junk mail, shredded paper, etc.
  • Boxboard: cereal boxes, pasta boxes, etc.
  • Containers: clean food cans, beverage containers, hard plastic containers #1-7, deposit items
  • Corrugated cardboard: flattened and folder beneath blue bag. Keep bundle of cardboard to 2 feet by 3 feet in size

When using the Blue Bag Program please remember:

  • Include only those items listed above
  • Rinse all containers
  • All boxes MUST be collapsed
  • If you are unsure if an item is recyclable, please call Prairie Disposal LTD at 780-539-5950 BEFORE placing it at the curb
  • When in doubt – leave it out
  • In the event that any of the guidelines listed are not followed, Prairie Disposal maintains the right to leave items curbside. Those items are left curbside are the responsibility of the home-owner.

Hierarchy of Plans in Alberta

Hierarchy of Plans in Alberta

Land use planning in Alberta is subject to plans at both the provincial level and the municipal level of government. In addition, with the implementation of the provincial Land Use Framework and the Alberta Land Stewardship Act some planning decisions will be made at the regional level. Above is a diagram outlining the various plans, their hierarchy and their place in the provincial, regional and municipal realms.

Village of Donnelly receives Grant to upgrade lighting at the Sportex

Village of Donnelly receives grant to upgrade lighting at the Sportex

 

Pictured is Guy-Donnelly Sportex committee member Pauline Therriault under the brand new lights installed above the ice surface.

Village of Donnelly were successful applicants of the Recreation Energy Conservation Funding Program through Municipal Climate Change Action Centre (MCCAC).

The grant funding (totalling $19,971.44) allowed the Guy-Donnelly Sportex to replace old lights throughout the building, retrofitting them to LED fixtures and bulbs. Already members and users of the facility are noticing how much brighter the arena has become as a result of the retrofit.

“These new lights are fabulous. They brighten the building and reduce the energy required to do so. The energy reduction relates to future cost savings for operating,” says Donnelly Mayor Myrna Lanctot. “The Sportex committee and Climate Change Coordinator Emily Plihal deserve a pat on the back for their hard work on achieving this project.”

With installation of new lights throughout the facility, it is expected the Village will reduce their energy use by 37,212 kWh per year translating to an annual cost savings of $8,930.94. These retrofits will significantly reduce their GHG emissions and operating budget.

Village of Donnelly receives grant to reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Village of Donnelly receives grant to reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

 

Village of Donnelly were successful applicants of the Recreation Energy Conservation Funding Program through Municipal Climate Change Action Centre (MCCAC).

The grant funding (totalling $25,227) allowed the Guy-Donnelly Sportex to install a deaerator designed by REALIce on the facility’s ice making system to help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

The REALice water treatment system for arenas eliminates the need for hot water when building and resurfacing ice. The system removes the micro-air bubbles from water without using chemicals, filters or membranes. With the ability to utilize cold water during the process, facilities will notice substantially lower utility costs annually and over the lifetime of the device.

Donnelly’s Climate Change Coordinator Emily Plihal explains the system will help reduce environmental impact and will also help to save money on energy bills.

“The Village councillors and Sportex volunteer board have been looking at ways to reduce operational costs that will also help their facility become more environmentally friendly,” says Plihal. “After installation of the deaerator system it is expected that the facility will notice a GHG emissions reduction of 45 tCO2e per year. Notably this reduces their energy consumption by an expected 43,000 kWh annually, which will save significant amounts of money spent on utilities.”

The device was installed at the arena at the beginning of August and will be utilized when the facility gets ready to open later this fall.

“MCCAC staff members were very helpful in the application process,” says Plihal. “The grants provided by MCCAC allow municipalities to invest in opportunities that they may not otherwise be able to afford. The grants provide the opportunity for municipalities in our province to make changes that help to reduce environmental impact thus mitigating climate change.”